Another Commonplace Book

Gramarye, Divine Philosophy, the Usual

764 notes

asylum-art:

Carol Golemboski

In the Psychometry photographs, arrangements of old objects in dilapidated spaces serve as metaphors for human emotions and psychological states. The term “psychometry” refers to the pseudo-science of “object reading,” a purported psychic ability to divine the history of objects through physical contact. The objects in these pictures seem haunted. They are designed to transcend their material nature and evoke the mysterious presence of past.

(via laurenbeukes)

Filed under photography psychometry

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modernfencing:

[ID: a group of men with foils and masks. Old, black and white photo.]
Members of a New York fencing studio, including Hildreth Kennedy Bloodgood (2nd from left), Regis Senac (2nd from right), and Eugene Higgins (right).

Hildreth. Kennedy. Bloodgood. The fencer.
Well, he is going in a story.

modernfencing:

[ID: a group of men with foils and masks. Old, black and white photo.]

Members of a New York fencing studio, including Hildreth Kennedy Bloodgood (2nd from left), Regis Senac (2nd from right), and Eugene Higgins (right).

Hildreth. Kennedy. Bloodgood. The fencer.

Well, he is going in a story.

(Source: digitalcollections.nypl.org)

Filed under fencing best names

3,454 notes

starwars:

Throwback Thursday - Bob Anderson, expert swordsman, fight choreographer, Vader stunt double. A legend.

He was also an Olympian, and choreographed the fencing in The Princess Bride. One of the all time greats.

starwars:

Throwback Thursday - Bob Anderson, expert swordsman, fight choreographer, Vader stunt double. A legend.

He was also an Olympian, and choreographed the fencing in The Princess Bride. One of the all time greats.

(via geardrops)

Filed under fencing badasses

186 notes

hollyblack:

While I have you on the line…or I guess fanmail-tumblr-thingie, I was wondering if I could ask you a question or two. Yeah, two. You don’t need to respond if you don’t want/have time to, but I’d appreciate it if you did :)
Firstly, what made you start writing in a way that made you love it, and b, how do you plot your books?

This question came in through the “mail” part of tumblr, so I although I am answering this publicly, I deleted all the personal information of the asker, in case they didn’t want that to be public. It’s just such a great question, though, that I wanted to talk about it a bit.

What made you start writing in a way that made you love it?

That’s the big question, the question we have to answer over and over for every project.

I remember writing draft after draft of Tithe, not loving what I was writing and not knowing how to write something I would love. This was also a period when I was incredibly critical of everything I read. There were very few books I could read without ripping apart — and then there were a few I felt were so perfect that they taught me nothing. They seemed completely seamless, with no way in and no way to analyze how to replicate what I liked.

Adding to that, I had some odd ideas about writing. I knew I was supposed to show and not tell, so I never told anyone anything, even if that made it super confusing for the reader. I knew that I wasn’t supposed to be derivative or cliched, so every time something happened, I tried to make the characters do the opposite of what was expected, even if that was less interesting.

Those early drafts were awful and they were awful because I was writing to please my (intimidated) writer self. I wasn’t writing for the part of me that mattered — my reader self

Asking myself what I liked — and answering honestly — was the first step in getting to writing stuff I loved. We worry a lot about the market when we’re starting out (and maybe even when we’re no longer starting out), but we have to trust that if we love a thing, there will be other readers who love it too. Maybe not the most possible readers, but our readers.

As for plotting — it helps to know these things:

(a) what does the protagonist want? (b) what’s the obstacle? (b) what’s at stake?* (c) what are the agendas of the other characters in the book? (d) what is the thing, which, once it happens, means the book is over? (e) what are some fun things that you want to happen along the way? (f) what’s the ticking clock and when does it kick in? (g) how does the protagonist change by the end? and (h) what’s the protagonist’s secret?

It’s okay if you don’t know all those things. But, like I said, they help.

Then, I would say, try to give yourself touch points in the manuscript. Not everyone works to an outline, but most writers exist on a spectrum between plotters and pantsers

*People talk a lot about making sure the stakes are high, but let me say instead that the stakes should be highly personal. Yes, it makes sense to want to save the world — that’s where you keep your stuff, right? — but losing a job, disappointing the people you love, losing a loved one, etc. are usually more intense stakes.

Holly gives such great writing advice.

Filed under writing writing advice Holly Black smart ladies