Another Commonplace Book

Gramarye, Divine Philosophy, the Usual

342 notes

dunawhoo asked: A boss once told me, "Find your voice." ... What does that even *mean*?

amandapalmer:

it means that everybody is truly uniquely different, when it comes down to it, but we spend our lives trying to sound right and look right; mostly by trying to sound and look like other people and getting lost in the echo and the imitation.

if you’re still enough, there’s a sound and expression that comes out of you that isn’t like anything that’s ever happened before or will ever happen again.

that’s your voice.

it’s who you actually *are*, instead of the person you think everyone is supposed to be seeing…the pretty one, the fat one, the perfect one, the one who’s “good at x”, the dutiful daughter, the long-suffering addict, the one in control, etc. none of those things are you, or your voice. your voice is what’s underneath that.

if that makes sense.

Maybe the best definition of this I’ve ever seen. And it explains why it can be so hard to find.

Filed under voices finding them smart ladies

19 notes

emilystjohnmandel:

paulbogaards:

"No more scrolling through litanies of dreams and nervous hopes and photographs of lunches, cries for help and expressions of contentment and relationship-status updates with heart icons whole or broken, plans to meet up later, pleas, complaints, desires, pictures of babies dressed as bears or peppers for Halloween. No more reading and commenting on the lives of others, and in so doing, feeling slightly less alone in the room. No more avatars." — Emily St. John Mandel, Station Eleven
LOVE. THIS. BOOK.

Alternating between “how has Station Eleven not been published yet? I’ve been up to my neck in it for years…” and “oh my god, we’re less than two weeks from publication…”

I was lucky enough to get an advance copy of Station Eleven. It is extraordinary. The world of the book is sad and beautiful and full of brave characters and it is so gorgeously written. It has Shakespeare and comic books and a Traveling Symphony and maybe the end of the world. Or not. You want it.

emilystjohnmandel:

paulbogaards:

"No more scrolling through litanies of dreams and nervous hopes and photographs of lunches, cries for help and expressions of contentment and relationship-status updates with heart icons whole or broken, plans to meet up later, pleas, complaints, desires, pictures of babies dressed as bears or peppers for Halloween. No more reading and commenting on the lives of others, and in so doing, feeling slightly less alone in the room. No more avatars." — Emily St. John Mandel, Station Eleven

LOVE. THIS. BOOK.

Alternating between “how has Station Eleven not been published yet? I’ve been up to my neck in it for years…” and “oh my god, we’re less than two weeks from publication…”

I was lucky enough to get an advance copy of Station Eleven. It is extraordinary. The world of the book is sad and beautiful and full of brave characters and it is so gorgeously written. It has Shakespeare and comic books and a Traveling Symphony and maybe the end of the world. Or not. You want it.

Filed under Station Eleven excellent books

10 notes

THE END OF THE SENTENCE, how i love thee, let me count the ways (no really i am going to count them)

jennirl:

a list review of THE END OF THE SENTENCE by kat-howard and mariadahvanaheadley:

  1. it has a haunted house, but not the kind of haunted house you’re thinking of if you’ve ever seen a movie with a haunted house.
  2. it maintains a seriously creepy atmosphere, but the creepy factor shifts throughout the book. for example sometimes you get THE SHINING, sometimes you get shades of the Brothers Grimm, and then at the end you get this batshit intensity that i am assuming comes from the alchemy produced by their creatively conjoined brains.
  3. i now want to stand in front of a mirror with a horseshoe and say “Dusha Chuchonnyhoof” seven times and see what happens even though i’m pretty sure i would die of terror around number three.
  4. the motivations are so solid. frequently in horror movies/books, people are like “wait i’ll just do this thing even though it’s CLEARLY a bad idea” because why??? and you want to shake them and send them to their rooms so they don’t die horrible deaths. but here, there are actual Reasons that people Do Things. so refreshing!
  5. there are so many great fable and folklore touches. why don’t more horror novels deal with folklore? FOLKLORE IS MESSED UP, YOU GUYS. in many great ways.
  6. they leave a few mysteries a touch mysterious, just enough so that you pretty much immediately want to go back and read it again to see what you might have missed the first time through.

you should probably preorder it. i’ll be over here drooling over the idea of the fancy leatherbound version.

Okay yes. This is a total vanity reblog. But this list makes me so happy, I don’t even care.

Also, don’t do Number Three. Just don’t. 

Filed under the end of the sentence things that made my day

1,321 notes

asylum-art:

Carol Golemboski

In the Psychometry photographs, arrangements of old objects in dilapidated spaces serve as metaphors for human emotions and psychological states. The term “psychometry” refers to the pseudo-science of “object reading,” a purported psychic ability to divine the history of objects through physical contact. The objects in these pictures seem haunted. They are designed to transcend their material nature and evoke the mysterious presence of past.

(via laurenbeukes)

Filed under photography psychometry

19 notes

modernfencing:

[ID: a group of men with foils and masks. Old, black and white photo.]
Members of a New York fencing studio, including Hildreth Kennedy Bloodgood (2nd from left), Regis Senac (2nd from right), and Eugene Higgins (right).

Hildreth. Kennedy. Bloodgood. The fencer.
Well, he is going in a story.

modernfencing:

[ID: a group of men with foils and masks. Old, black and white photo.]

Members of a New York fencing studio, including Hildreth Kennedy Bloodgood (2nd from left), Regis Senac (2nd from right), and Eugene Higgins (right).

Hildreth. Kennedy. Bloodgood. The fencer.

Well, he is going in a story.

(Source: digitalcollections.nypl.org)

Filed under fencing best names